Painting

Upcoming Show at Fourth Corner Frames!

I will be part of a group show for the month of August! 

Atlas Painting, 4 ft x 2 ft, Kendra Aldrich.jpg

"A Member of the Family"

August 3 - September 1, 2018

Opening Reception August 3, 6-9 PM for Bellingham Art Walk

Forth Corner Frames Statement on the show:

"Bellingham abounds in artists, ...dogs, cats, horses, and ...well pets! At FCF we decided it was time to unite the two together. Examples of six artist's work will be on display. Participating artists will be here August 3rd during Art Walk! Coupons for framing any pet portraits are available during the show." 

 
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311 W Holly St, Bellingham, WA

 

360-734-1340     www.fourthcornerframes.com


Glad to be a part of this show with some amazing local artists! I have a few pieces that have not been seen before in the show. I should be at the show during Bellingham's First Friday Art Walk, I hope to see you there! 

Millie Oil Painting

This painting is of Millie, who sadly has passed. This painting is 8x10 and in oils. We focused on featuring her wrinkles, ears, and droopy face. Her owner really loved her titling her head to the side when she looked at you. 

MilliePainting1.jpg
She was almost 100 lbs but thought she was a lap dog. She loved to snuggle on the couch, and was very lazy, until she was outside or around other dogs. She loved to be chased and to wrestle. She could chase a ball for hours but was terrible at retrieving it to the thrower.
— Alyson
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I really enjoyed capturing all the subtle colors in the black of her snout. It had a lot of violet and red undertones. Working with oils on this one really allowed me to blend those colors together. 

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Kane Oil Painting

This painting is of Kane, a rescue puppy from Houston, Texas who now resides in Indiana. This is a 8x10 oil painting that was a gift for his owner! 

Kane Paint.jpg
Kane Angle Painting.jpg

This painting was a fun one, working on a dog that is mostly white is a bit of a challenge. You really have to look and see the variations of color within the white areas within the photo. So often I used violets or blue's as undertones and built up from there. When oil painting there is a bit more mixing that can be done on canvas, compared to acrylic painting. 

Kane with Photo.jpg

 

Also I apologize for the lighting in this video, my oil station has a camera that likes to adjust to focus on its own and I don't have the angle of the camera perfected. 

Luman the Lab/Pit Mix Painting

I absolutely adore this painting, I mean look at those eyes! He is all grown up now, (and still cute, I've seen pictures) and this painting is to remember his puppy days. 

Photo 1 Luman 6x6.jpg
Photo 2 Luman 6x6.jpg
Luman is a pit bull and lab mix. He is a very curious, gentle, playful, and caring dog. He loves to dig, and get into things he shouldn’t. He will sometimes follow me around or sit next to me and watch whatever I am doing. He can be very playful, he gets very excited when we come home and will force us to play fetch with him. He often whines playfully when him and my boyfriend are goofing around. What I love about Luman most is that he is a very gentle dog. When giving him a treat, he will slowly move his mouth towards it and grasp the treat with his lips, it is very cute. And in the mornings, we often wake up to him giving us soft and gentle kisses. You can tell that he really loves his home, and my boyfriend and I!
— Meghan
Photo 4 Luman 6x6.jpg
Photo 5 Lumen 6x6.jpg

Sally Painting

This painting is of Sally, the beautiful herding dog who sadly is no longer around. This was a fun painting to do because the background was really nice to paint along with the dog. The painting is 8x8 in Acrylic.

 

 

 Detail

Detail

“Sally came from herding stock and we bought her at a feed store.  When she was a puppy I played soccer with her and she would nip at the backs of my legs to herd me.  She was a very loyal dog and was protective of her small pack.  If my mom and I weren’t walking right next to each other on a hike then she would run between both us to make sure we both were okay.  She was sort of an alpha female and when she played with other dogs she sort of tried to herd them and would sometimes bark in a shrill tone.  She was intelligent and really enjoyed playing find it in the house.  We would put her in her crate and then hide a toy or food and she would search every room and hiding place until she found it.   
— Laura
 Sally and the reference photo!

Sally and the reference photo!

Caring for your New Painting!

Great so you just got a new painting! But how do you keep it looking its best and care for it?

 I try to include a little sheet with a version of the following with the paintings I send out. I thought it would be good to post about it and let everyone know my tips for caring for a painting.

I try to include a little sheet with a version of the following with the paintings I send out. I thought it would be good to post about it and let everyone know my tips for caring for a painting.

HOW TO CARE FOR YOUR PAINTINGS  

It is always a good idea to handle a painting with care, they aren’t the most fragile things, but they are not rock solid either. Try to avoid touching the front surface of your painting. Holding and touching your piece won’t ruin it, but the oil from your fingers can linger on the surface and that’s something we’d like to stay away from.

Your painting is protected with varnish*, so it is okay to blow away the dust from the surface on an as needed basis with compressed air. Another option is to take a soft bristle brush and wipe away the dust.  To clean the sides, use a soft, non-abrasive cloth and apply gentle pressure to wipe. It is best to only clean the front if absolutely necessary.

HANGING TIPS

Keep your artwork away from direct sunlight. The best type of light for your painting is indirect sunlight, recessed lighting, or halogen lights.

It is not advisable to place your artwork above a heat source such as a fireplace. Keep your painting away from Ultraviolet light.

It is not advisable to hang paintings in a moist environment such as a room which has a bath or shower. Try to display your paintings in a place where the relative humidity and temperature levels are fairly constant.

TRANSPORT & STORAGE TIPS

 Storing canvases vertically is ideal!

Storing canvases vertically is ideal!

Canvas can be stretched or punctured fairly easy. So avoid stacking or leaning anything with an edge or corner on your painting. Even stacking or leaning one painting against another can leave an imprint. If you need to store your painting, it is best to store it vertically.

If you are needing to ship or move your painting, I would suggest wrapping it in an acid free paper, or if that is not available, wax paper.

 

 


*Acrylic paintings are protected with a final varnish. Oil paintings have a retouch varnish on the surface. Oil paintings cannot have a final varnish applied until it has been dry for 6 months to a year. If you can get your painting to me to apply a final varnish I would be happy to, otherwise take it to a professional to varnish.

Time Lapse Catch Up + Cyber Monday!

I hope that everyone had a good and very filling Thanksgiving!

Here are a few time lapses that I have not posted here yet! It has just become part of my process to film while painting so I get these videos for nearly all paintings. 

Also today is Cyber Monday! I didn't end up doing a Black Friday deal.  So if you are reading this and would like to order a painting, use the code CM10$OFF for 10$ off on any order!  Valid though 11:59 PST Nov, 27th! 

Photo Tips for Getting Great Pet Photos

The photographs I receive and use as references for my paintings are a large part of the painting process as a whole. Since I work from photos, the completed portrait depends on the quality of the photos you send me! When available send photos that are high quality and taken with a digital camera. 

 For a close up portrait of your pet, make sure you fill up the viewfinder with your pet, rather than taking a far off photo that you have to zoom in on. This will make sure we can see the details.

For a close up portrait of your pet, make sure you fill up the viewfinder with your pet, rather than taking a far off photo that you have to zoom in on. This will make sure we can see the details.

 Paintings can be goofy! A good photo does not always have to be a serious one. 

Paintings can be goofy! A good photo does not always have to be a serious one. 

•  Take photos outdoors, on a fair day, in early morning or late afternoon, or indoors in a bright and well-lit room. Taking photos in natural light, preferably in the shade to prevent harsh shadows, will help reflect the true coloring of your pet. 

•  Take the photos in a place where your pet is comfortable being themselves, such as in your yard, in the windowsill, etc. 

•  Have someone help. One person should be free to take the photo and someone else to pose or entertain the pet.

•  Get down or up to pet eye-level to take your pet’s photos. Remember that the eyes are the most expressive part of an animal’s face! This is helpful for creating good perspective, and this will translate best to canvas. 

•  Take lots of photos, from many different angles and different poses. 

•  If your pet is dark-colored, try to take photos in front of lighter backgrounds; if your pet is light-colored, try to take photos in front of darker backgrounds. In general, keep backgrounds simple and uncluttered is really helpful. 

•  Photographing your pet on a hard surface such as wood flooring, concrete or windowsills is ideal as it allows us to see their paws. 

•  Use a camera with an automatic focus. Animals move quickly and often, and adjusting the manual focus can take a little time.

•  Let your pet take breaks and act natural, sometimes tiring them out before a photo session makes for some great smiles! 

•  Don’t forget to pay your model! Treats, toys, love and affection are all good payment!